Wahjay-Kids: Information that you miss in standard profiles, who they are and how we met them

This is a request for all Wahjay-STEM supporters to write a note of encouragement for our Wahjay-STEM students as they embark in an unknown territory. These students were a part of the first Wahjay-STEM pilot and will showcase their new talents at the first national Wahjay-STEM robotics competition on March 8, 2017. Our top students will go to the international robotics competition to represent Liberia for the first time. Here about Wahjay-STEM’s background in relation to these students, and please write a note of encouragement. Hardship stories are welcomed so that our Wahjay students can see that each human being is an overcomer and everything is obtained through perseverance!

In 2015, Giewee Giah, founder of Wahjay-STEM requested a profile of her perspective students and found that her students come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, similar to the public school systems in developed nations. She learned that some of her students were orphaned, she learned that some students came from the ideal two-family home structure, and she found that like her, some students were growing up in single-parent homes.

Ironically, during this time, Giewee Giah was completing her second Master degree in Analytics had never visited Liberia, West Africa. She depended on her partner organization, Nyonblee Cares Foundation for the student profiles. The student profiles came to life once she was able to engage with the students in 2016. Here is what she found:

One day, Giewee explained to kids the importance of a good breakfast before coming to school, here is what she learned:

  • Some students had parents who were not able to afford three meals a day, and those students came to school hungry and desperately awaited lunch during a rigorous school-day

One day, Giewee requested that each parent sign a publicity waiver so that student profiles and images can appear in Wahjay-STEM marketing material, here is what she learned:

  • A majority of the students’ parents were illiterate in both the native language, Bassa, and the English language and were unable to write out permission for their child.
  • All of the parents were grateful for the Wahjay-STEM program at their child’s school and wanted to allow their children to advocate for Wahjay-STEM publically, so the school administration received several calls the following morning asking what they could do.

In the profiles, Giewee found that the student’s grade level was disproportionate to their ages. Some children were 16 years old, and in 6th grade, etc., very few children were in a grade appropriate for their age. This disproportion highlighted how devastating the Liberian Civil Wars were to the country’s education system. After the war, many children sat idle or were required to work because school was not an option due to no funding or no place to host their studies. Now that these students have a place to host their education, and a few have the funding to support their studies, the problem to solve becomes quality.

Academia is supposed to provide some standard level of preparedness for the available opportunities in the community. Giewee found that those offered opportunities were unable to be taken by the local residence because the quality in their education was not there. This widening gap between the quality of education and the roles to be filled by STEM-related companies persists because quality STEM education is not mandatory in schools. Teachers lack regular training and standard testing to scale and replicate an acceptable level of quality to deliver to all students to prepare them for the career of their choice. Students do not have the same degree of access to material that would quench their curiosity outside of the classroom, leaving Liberia’s education in a distressed state. In this distressed position, Liberian citizens have a harder time adjusting to the demands of the modern world. Without a basis of quality education, Liberians are left with careers that they did not choose, for those who may desire more income, they are left wondering what choices they could have made for a different circumstance. Unfortunately, they may have made the right decisions, i.e., choosing to go to school and seeking higher education, but the system may not have been able to offer to resources that they needed to thrive they way they would have liked.

Our Wahjay kids have lofty ambitions, meet a few of them. With an impact-driven roadmap, persistent implementation, and proper administrative and teacher training, we have planted 25 seeds with a growth projection that will lead our student’s satisfying careers.

Meet four of our Wahjay-STEM students:

biographies1

biographies2

 

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